How about some – English Crumpets!!

Moving from England to the U.S. brought with it a lot of adjustments.
The biggest, for me, was the food.
All the tried and trusted brands I was familiar with, for example,  Oxo cubes, Heinz soups, Bisto etc; were no more…unless I wanted to pay the exuberant prices at an import store that is.
And forget things like a good old ‘banger’ ‘pork pie’ ‘cornish pasty’ or ‘yorkshire pud’..they just don’t exist.
And don’t even get me started on what the Americans refer to as bacon 😉

All was not lost, over the years I’ve learned to find comparable products….and make my own.
( food, not brands 😉 )

But one of the things I found myself missing the most was the good old English crumpet!
Seriously…of all things.
So, last week after pricing them online
(and deciding $16 with shipping, for ONE pack was beyond ridiculous)
I figured I’d have a bash at making my own.

Off to good old Google I went…..
A bazillion recipes later, I stumbled upon one from Delia Smith.
Ahhhh, now that’s a name I recognized…I couldn’t possibly go wrong with her recipe.
It states it makes 12 crumpets!! Yay, 12 delicious buttery pieces of heaven.
I could hardly wait to get started!!
I rushed over to Amazon, placed an order for crumpet/muffin rings…selected free two day shipping.
And off to the store we went to get the ingredients.
(well the bread flour..the rest I had in)

Well, I followed the recipe to the T…every step did exactly what she said it would…until:
1 tablespoon of batter in each ring???
Are you serious?….I want to make crumpets, not pancakes.
So I used 3 tablespoons per ring.
I ended up with 8 crumpets….they were nice but maybe a tad too yeasty tasting, and still pretty thin even using 3 times the amount she suggested.

Crumpets using Delia Smith's Recipe

Crumpets using Delia Smith’s Recipe

Next I tried modifying the recipe a little…made it with a blend of half bread flour, half AP flour. Size wise, they were perfect…holey, as they should be…but now pretty blah tasting!

Modified Recipe 1

Modified Recipe 1

And sooo….Modification #2.
And you know what they say? Third time’s a charm!!

So I made a couple of adjustments to the recipe.
I ended up with 12 crumpets of a decent size and they tasted just how I remember them.
Not too bland…not too yeasty!

So…let’s get to it…

Ingredients

Ingredients

16oz (2 cups) Bread flour.
1/2 Pint (1 cup) Milk.
1/2 Pint (1 cup) Water.
1 teaspoon Sugar.
1 teaspoon Salt.
I x 7g packet of Active Dry Yeast.

Heat the milk and water together in a saucepan until hand hot.
Then pour into a bowl, add sugar and yeast and whisk a little to mix.
Cover with cling film and leave in a warm place for 10-15 minutes until the yeast activates and it gets a frothy head on it

Yeast Mixture

In the meantime, sift the flour and salt into a bowl.flour mix
When the yeast mixture is ready, pour it into a mixing bowl and give it a whisk.
Slowly add the flour, whisking after each addition to maintain a smooth batter.

Add flour to yeast mixture!

Add flour to yeast mixture!

Now cover the batter mix, and leave in a warm place for approx One hour 30 minutes, until it has risen, fell and frothy.

Frothy Batter

Frothy Batter

Now comes the bit you’ve been waiting for…making Crumpets!!
I used a scrunched up piece of plastic wrap and a spread similar to ‘Can’t Believe its not Butter’ to grease both the crumpet rings and my heavy bottomed non stick ceramic frying pan.

grease the rings

grease the rings

Put the frying pan over a medium/low heat and arrange the crumpet rings in the middle.

heating the pan and rings

heating the pan and rings

When the pan is heated (I checked by putting my hand over it until I could feel the warmth) ladle in some of the oooey gooey elasticky batter to approx half way up the rings.

batter

batter

(I overfilled the first couple of rings as you can see in the photo)

Cook them slowly for about 8 to 10 minutes until the top has dried out and filled with holes.

Photo-11
Remove the rings (you can remove them when the outer part of the crumpet is dry) but be careful, they are HOT. I used a folded piece of kitchen towel to grab the ring.
They should slip out easy if you greased the rings well, if not, give them a little nudge with a knife.
Now flip the crumpets over, and cook for just a minute.

flip crumpets

flip crumpets

Cool on a wire rack while you prepare for the next batch.
(I allowed the pan to cool slightly between batches so that the crumpets didn’t cook too fast on the bottoms.)
Clean the rings if necessary, or just re grease them well and re grease the frying pan.
And you are set for batch two!

Here’s my batch of perfect crumpets!
I know I said there was 12…but a couple may have disappeared already 😉

Finished Product!

Finished Product!

If you are new to crumpets….let me warn you…you never eat them cold.
Cold crumpets are nothing short of YUK! EEEW! GROSS!
You pop them in the toaster, and serve them hot with lashings of butter.
Or if you prefer, a fruit spread or even honey.

I prefer butter…lots of butter 😉

That's where that pesky Crumpet went to ;)

That’s where that pesky Crumpet went to 😉

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13 Responses to How about some – English Crumpets!!

  1. Yum! That looks wonderful!

    You have to be in the upper Midwest to find real Cornish pasties. In the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, where mines attracted large numbers of immigrants for Cornwall, they make an awesome pastie. Semi-Demi-Exboyfriend and his sister, both refugees from the UP, are artists with these treats.

    There’s a brand of English muffin that approximates a crumpet — I can’t recall the name and don’t know if it’s even made anymore. Most “English muffins” here are really nothing but balloon bread shaped into disks — they’re bland and pillowy and awful.

    I haven’t found anything resembling a true banger in this country. Personally, I prefer a decent brand of American bacon (there aren’t many) to the chewy stuff you get in England, but it has to be said that the English bacon is at least made of meat, not mostly fat. It used to be that when you bought Canadian bacon from a butcher, you got a high-quality processed pork process, but that’s no longer true as far as I can tell. I haven’t seen decent Canadian bacon in years.

    Liked by 1 person

    • “from Cornwall”E “pork product,” not “pork process”!!!! Arrrgh…editor, edit thyself!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Tracey says:

      In my little part of the U.S. (central PA) I struggle to find anything that resembles British food.
      In the first year here, everyone proudly announced to me they sold English muffins, ironically though, I’d never even heard of ‘English muffins’ until I moved to the States. 😉
      I have to admit, I don’t like them….your description is spot on!!
      American bacon, is what we call (in the UK) streaky bacon. I don’t like the chewy stuff they serve in cafes in the UK either. But home cooked bacon (fat and rind removed) was yum!

      Like

      • If things are still as they were around 1975, when I was there, then one thing Americans don’t realize is how excellent the produce and meat are, when you buy them from greengrocers and butchers in England. Friends invited us to Christmas Dinner and proposed to serve turkey — not something I’m crazy about. Used to like it when I was a kid but now find it flavorless and unpleasant.

        Well, the bird was WONDERFUL. It actually had a flavor! It tasted like I remember turkey tasting. All of which, I suppose, goes to show that the industrial poultry business that’s taken over here has pretty much ruined the quality of chicken and turkey. It’s not my imagination and it’s not that my taste buds have failed in old age: turkey objectively can taste like turkey, and once upon a time in the US it did.

        LOL! I never saw anything that even looked like American bacon while we were living in London.

        Like

      • Tracey says:

        A lot has changed since then.
        In the 70’s there was a butchers and greengrocers within pretty much walking distance from anywhere. I remember because I had to make that trip everyday for my mum.
        Although supermarkets have taken over, for the most part now, there are still both to be found, just not as plentiful as they were.
        I do have to agree though, there is a huge difference in quality and flavor.
        Fish is another example.
        For most of my life, (in the UK) I lived in or near one of the worlds largest fishing ports.
        I was spoiled with fresh, or freshly frozen fish products.
        I’ve purchased a lot of fish since living in the States, but until recently, on our trip to Indiana, I’d never tasted anything as fresh and delicious as the fish I would buy in England.
        We ate at a semi fast food restaurant called ‘Culvers’. They had a North Atlantic Cod sandwich on the menu. I thought I’d try it, but had no expectations of it tasting too great. OMG! it was amazing!
        The freshest, juiciest and nice thick piece of Cod I have had since moving here. I seriously wanted to pack the restaurant up with me and bring it home, just so I could eat their cod sandwiches everyday for the rest of my life.

        Like

  2. Kathy Samuel says:

    Just seeing these made my mouth water! I use Delia’s recipe too as a starting point and then just do my own thing. I haven’t made them in ages – I must make a batch! In fact I want one now!!!

    Like

    • Tracey says:

      I know, they’re addictive aren’t they. Once I decided I wanted to make them, there was no stopping me.
      We have family coming to stay tomorrow…I’m going to whip up a batch or two for them 🙂
      Enjoy!! 🙂

      Like

  3. Tracey- I love English crumpets!! Beautiful post!!

    Like

  4. Thingo says:

    Elizabeth David has good advice and crumpet recipes.
    While the traditional combination, as per The Goons, is Crunny and Humpets, I also enjoy crumpets buttered with pepper ground over the top.

    Like

    • Tracey says:

      I’d never heard of Elizabeth David…I had to google her LOL
      I’ve never tried pepper on them, and I think I might be a little too stuck in my ways to dare to 😉

      Like

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